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322 East Front Street
Boise, ID, 83702
United States

208-373-4344

Providing the knowledge and technology required to improve the availability of native plant materials for restoring diverse native plant communities across the Great Basin.

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GBNPP Blog

Climate Science Center Offers Semester-Long Course - August 17

Alexis Malcomb

The South Central Climate Science Center is launching a free semester-long open online course called “Managing for a Changing Climate,” on August 17. 

Participants will learn about the components of a climate system, including the range of natural climate variability and external drivers of climate change. Students will also evaluate the impacts of a changing climate on multiple sectors such as the economy, policy, ecosystems and indigenous populations.

Students will gain an understanding of how natural processes, ecosystems and human society are being impacted by climate today and how adaptation and mitigation strategies are being implemented across the individual, local, national and international scales. 

 

FWS press release features GBNPP member Sarah Kulpa

Corey Gucker

FWS press release features GBNPP member Sarah Kulpa, a botanist and plant ecologist from the Reno Fish and Wildlife Office.

The article describes how Sarah is leading the way to help scientists, landowners, and other partners that conservation depends not only upon what’s happening on the ground, but also what’s in the ground.

Too often, the missing link is seeds from native plants.

Read the full article here.

Sarah Kulpa, a US Fish and Wildlife Service botanist, works with native plants in the University of Nevada-Reno greenhouse complex. Credit: Dan Hottle/USFWS

Sarah Kulpa, a US Fish and Wildlife Service botanist, works with native plants in the University of Nevada-Reno greenhouse complex. Credit: Dan Hottle/USFWS

Featured article on conserving and restoring native plant communities and the National Seed Strategy

Corey Gucker

The Spring issue of the Smithsonian's Department of Botany & the U.S. National Herbarium Newsletter, the Plant Press, features an article on conserving and restoring native plant communities and the National Seed Strategy by Sara Oldfield.

Seed Strategy article here:
http://nmnh.typepad.com/the_plant_press/2016/05/sustaining-and-restoring-plant-diversity.html

Full issue of the Plant Press here:
http://nmnh.typepad.com/files/vol19no2.pdf

Highlights from the OSU MES Wildflower Production Field Day 2016

Alexis Malcomb

"At a recently held ‘Wildflower Production Field Day’, Dr. Clint Shock (Station Director and Professor of Crop Research, Irrigation Management, Watershed Stewardship) and colleagues shared the progress gained over the last decade through their field-based research into native plant seed production efforts."

Read full article by Olga A Kildisheva & Nancy L Shaw here.

 

Symposium Replay: Putting Resilience and Resistance Concepts into Practice

Alexis Malcomb

Presented at the Sagebrush Ecosystems Conservation: All Lands, All Hands conference held in Salt Lake City, Utah

 

Date Recorded: February 24, 2016

Description: Ecosystem resilience and resistance concepts have rapidly emerged as an ecologically-based framework for coping with persistent threats in the sage steppe, such as wildfire and invasive annual grasses. Agencies have begun applying these concepts to assess risks, prioritize management activities, and select appropriate treatments from landscape to site scales. This session is designed to increase land managers’ awareness and understanding of how “R&R” applications can help them better maintain desired sagebrush communities. This 1.5 hour symposium was presented at the conference Sagebrush Ecosystems Conservation: All Lands, All Hands in February 2016.

 

Watch the On-Demand Replay here!

 

Members of an interagency science team seeking your ideas!

Alexis Malcomb

Members of an interagency science team responsible for assembling a science plan in support of the Integrated Rangeland Fire Management Strategy are seeking your ideas for developing a prioritized list of actionable science needs that will form the basis for a strategic research program to be implemented in 2017 and beyond.  Please see the attached flyer for more information.

The interagency team will host a series of web-based "town-hall" discussions to introduce you to the science plan and solicit your comments on the relative priority of each research need identified thus far. Each 2-hour discussion will focus on a specific topic per the following schedule:

Date      Time (Mountain Daylight Time)
May 9    12-2 pm   Fire and Invasives
May 10    2-4 pm   Sagebrush, Sage-grouse, and Climate
May 13  12-2 pm   Fire and Invasives
May 16  10 am-12 pm  Restoration
May 18  11 am-1 pm    Sagebrush, Sage-grouse, and Climate
May 20    2-4 pm   Restoration

You are welcome to participate in one or all of the discussions, but you need an internet connection to participate. There is no advance registration required.  Fifteen minutes prior to the session, simply go to https://meet39041854.adobeconnect.com/gnlcc  and log in as a “guest”.