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322 East Front Street
Boise, ID, 83702
United States

208-373-4344

Providing the knowledge and technology required to improve the availability of native plant materials for restoring diverse native plant communities across the Great Basin.

ARS Pollinating Insects- Biology, Management, Systematics Research

The mission of the Pollinating Insect-Biology, Management, Systematics Research is the development of non-Apis bees as crop pollinators. Such bees include, but are not limited to, mason bees, leafcutting bees, and bumble bees. Research emphasis areas for non-Apis bees include the development and improvement of commercial management systems (including pest and disease control and diagnosis), biology and natural history that relates to bee management, pollination for crop and seed production, conservation and ecology, and taxonomy and systematics. Crops that benefit from cross-pollination, especially crops that are more effectively pollinated by non-Apis bees than by honey bees or by non-Apis bees that complement or supplement honey bees, are targeted for evaluation of pollinator efficacy and improved crop production.

Jim Cane // Byron Love


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James H. Cane
USDA ARS Pollinating Insects- Biology, Management, Systematics Research
[Link]

Utah State University
Department of Biology
UMC5310
Logan, UT 84322

Phone: (435) 797-0530
Jim.Cane@ars.usda.gov

JCane.jpg

 

Dr. Cane has applied his long-term interest in conservation to help measure, understand, and mitigate human factors that can shift nesting and foraging opportunities for bee communities, such as climate change, urban sprawl, habitat fragmentation, and rangeland rehabilitation.

GBNPP Research Project(s):

Bee Pollination and Breeding Biology Studies
Jim Cane

Associated Publications:

Cane, J. H.; Dunne, R. 2014. Generalist bees pollinate red-flowered Penstemon eatonii: refining the hummingbird pollination syndrome. American Midland Naturalist. 171: 365-370.

Cane, J. H. 2014. The oligolectic bee Osmia brevis  sonicates Penstemon flowers for pollen; a newly documented behavior for the Megachilidae. Apidologie. 45: 675-684.

Cane, J. H.; Johnson, C.; Romero Napoles, J.; Johnson, D.; Hammon, B. 2013. Seed-feeding beetles (Bruchidae, Curculionidae, Brentidae) from legumes (Dalea ornata, Astragalus filipes) and other forbs needed for restoring rangelands of the Intermountain West. Western North American Naturalist. 73(4): 477-484.

Cane, J. H.; Love, B.; Swoboda, K. A. 2012. Breeding biology and bee guild of Douglas’ dustymaiden, Chaenactis douglasii (Asteraceae, Helenieae). Western North American Naturalist. 72(4): 563-568.


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Byron Love, Bee Biology PhD
USDA ARS Pollinating Insects- Biology, Management, Systematics Research
[Link]

Utah State University
Department of Biology
UMC5310
Logan, UT 84322

byron.love@usu.edu